Kluger Kaplan Signs New 24,133 SF Office Lease at Iconic Miami Center

Miami-based litigation powerhouse moves into a fresh new space

Photo Credit: Miami Downtown Development Authority

As Miami’s legal landscape continues to change, top litigation law firm, Kluger, Kaplan, Silverman, Katzen & Levine, evolves with the times.  This is why the firm is expanding its footprint in downtown Miami, updating its space and moving to a more contemporary and technologically advanced office. Kluger Kaplan gets its fresh identity on a new floor in the Miami Center, one of the city’s most iconic office towers. The new office space is 24,133 square feet on the 27th floor. The 12-year lease is good through 2026.

“Our prior lease was expiring, and we saw this as an opportunity to update our space,” said Alan Kluger, one of the founding members. “Miami Center is a first class building that has suited us very well. We like the proximity to the courthouse, the benefits provided by the adjacent Intercontinental Miami Hotel, local high-end restaurants, tropical views and the easy access for our personnel and clients.”

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Seven Kluger, Kaplan, Silverman, Katzen & Levine Attorneys Listed in “The Best Lawyers of America” 2015

Miami-based litigation law firm Kluger, Kaplan, Silverman, Katzen & Levine, P.L., announces seven of its attorneys have been selected as top legal practitioners by The Best Lawyers in America© 2015. Published by Woodward/White Inc., The Best Lawyers in America is widely regarded as the preeminent referral guide to the legal profession in the United States, basing its listings on an exhaustive year-long survey of the legal profession in which thousands of leading lawyers confidentially evaluate their professional peers. The current, 21st Edition of The Best Lawyers in America (2015), includes 52, 488 attorneys in 137 practice areas, covering all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and  based on more than 5.5 million detailed evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers.

Following are the Kluger Kaplan attorneys listed in The Best Lawyers in America 2015, along with their areas of concentration for which they were selected:

  • Deborah Chames / Of Counsel / Family Law
  • Abbey Kaplan / Member / Commercial Litigation / Entertainment Law / Litigation: Mergers & Acquisitions / Litigation: Real Estate
  • Alan Kluger / Member / Commercial Litigation / Litigation: Banking & Finance / Litigation: Real Estate
  • Philippe Lieberman / Member / Commercial Litigation
  • Steve Silverman / Member / Commercial Litigation
  • Bruce Katzen / Member / Securities / Capital Markets Law
  • Terri Meyers / Partner / Intellectual Property

Third DCA Affirms: A Voluntary Dismissal is not a Determination that an Injunction was Wrongfully Entered

By Jeffrey Berman

Last week, Kluger, Kaplan, Katzen and Levine, P.L. obtained a victory for a client when the Third DCA affirmed a ruling from Judge Sarah Zabel denying a motion to seek damages against an injunction bond. Read opinion here.

We obtained an injunction on behalf of our client, Aventura Tennis, LLC after the appellants opened up a competing business in violation of their non-compete agreements.  After the injunction expired on its own terms, we voluntarily dismissed the action.  The Defendants then sought to recover damages against the injunction bond, claiming that the voluntary dismissal operated as determination that they had been wrongfully enjoined.

Both the trial court and the appellate court agreed that based upon the facts of our case and the fact that we only dismissed the action after the injunction expired, the dismissal did not support a finding that the injunction was wrongfully entered and as a result, the Defendants were not entitled to proceed against the bond.

Although there are instances where a voluntary dismissal could result in a finding that a defendant was wrongfully enjoined, it is not automatic.  The courts must look to the facts of the case to determine whether a defendant is allowed to proceed on the bond.

The Americans with Disabilities Act opened doors

July 26 marked the anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a landmark law passed in 1990 that for the first time in our history created nationwide standards for combating discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, telecommunications relay services and government activities.

The Act has led to a number of significant legal decisions, which have helped to balance the rights and responsibilities of workers with disabilities and their employers. For example, the ADA requires owners of stores, restaurants and other public locations to provide access to people with disabilities — this is something we often take for granted.

As a labor and employment attorney, I often deal with cases involving the ADA. It is imperative that employers understand the law and the consequences of noncompliance.

Despite the ADA creating a benchmark for employers, it also created a strong foundation for lawmakers to build on and provide even broader protections for disabled workers. For example, President George W. Bush amended the law in 2008 and more recently, President Obama signed an executive order, requiring the federal government to hire 100,000 new employees with disabilities by 2015.

The ADA, like many other laws designed to combat discrimination, is successfully furthering the cause for equality among all people. With about 20 percent of the labor force made up of people with disabilities, everyone should take a moment to reflect on the importance of this law and be cognizant of its impact on our workforce in places of public accommodation, and how it has improved the quality of life for millions of Americans.

Michael Landen, Miami

The letter was published by the Miami Herald.

 

Litigation Landscape Changes as South Florida’s Economy Rebounds

Industry insiders may be tempted to think litigation is in recession now that South Florida’s economy is on the rebound but as Alan Kluger states in the Daily Business Review, that couldn’t be further from the truth. In this new economic cycle, he’s seeing less litigation between business partners fighting for leftover scraps from failed business ventures and more disputes among partners and joint venturers fighting over the fruits of the bounty of success.

He points out that many real estate projects that were previously faltering are now flourishing. So parties that were trying to restructure deal terms to mitigate their losses now want to restore the original deal terms to reap the benefits of the rebound economy.

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