Law office by day, art gallery by night

Visiting Kluger Kaplan’s Miami office overlooking Biscayne Bay feels like you stumbled upon a secret upscale art gallery more than a characteristic law office.

After hours the space transforms into an art gallery and welcomes non-profits and businesses who make a charitable contribution at the firm, for an intimate cocktail hour and art tour. All proceeds are donated to the charity’s organization.

Founding partner, Alan Kluger, and his wife, retired Miami-Dade Circuit Judge, Amy Dean, have been collecting artwork for more than 30 years. Kluger hand-picked from his private collection and moved several pieces into the office.

This past month, Kluger Kaplan hosted The Tribe, a group of Jewish young professionals looking to grow both personally and professionally in various leadership capacities.

The group received a personal guided tour from Alan, who showcased his latest collection featuring artists from countries throughout the world. Each piece reflects Kluger’s desire for understanding other cultures.

With Art Basel approaching, below are some pictures from The Tribe’s recent tour and a preview of some of the notable pieces that adorn the walls of Kluger Kaplan.

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The piece titled “Vision in Green” by Haitian-born painter and sculptor Edouard Duval-Carrie, represents how the Haitian population was decimated after the European conquistadors brought plague ad disease to the land.

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Alan Kluger’s passion for art is evident as he tells the story behind his latest collection.

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The piece titled “Hoy” was created by Douglas Arguelle Cruz, an artist who lives and works in Miami, Florida, originally from Havana, Cuba.

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Alan Kluger pictured with The Tribe during their visit.

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Cuban American artist Jorge Pantoja is known for his series of drawings, that have been called visual haikus. This piece titled “Perfectionist” demonstrates his use of intimate scale and meditative strokes.

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Los Carpinteros is a Cuban artist founded in Havana in 1992 by Marco Antonio, Castillo Valdes, Dagoberto Rodriguez Sanchez, and Alexandre Arrechea. In their work, the artists incorporate aspects of architecture, design and sculpture such as this piece titled “Downtown Verde.”

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This piece titled “Rapsodia en Azul” was created by Gonzalo Cienfuegos. Gonzalo was born in Santiago, Chile in 1949, and has exhibited in various countries including Argentina, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, Spain, France and the United States.

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Members of The Tribe socializing after their personalized art tour, lead by Alan Kluger.

 

 

Daily Business Review: Litigation Funding Changes Legal Landscape for Boutique and Small Firms

Daily Business Review

 

 

 

 

 

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa

The growth of litigation funding has widened the pool of law firms that can take on big cases, but their increasing popularity means boutique firms that have traditionally landed multimillion-dollar lawsuits by taking them on contingency or offering alternative fee arrangements are now taking a hit…

While boutique firms may feel that third-party funders are undercutting their business, smaller firms that once could not take on big-ticket cases are now able to compete. With the help of third-party funders, they can handle more multi-million dollar lawsuits than they would have otherwise.

“The pool of lawyers available to try a case expands because young lawyers who otherwise could not afford to take the case on contingency can now get funding,” said Alan Kluger, a founding member of Kluger, Kaplan, Silverman, Katzen & Levine. “That’s good. It gives clients a bigger pool of lawyers to choose from. The good lawyers are going to get a lot of work.”

Kluger said his firm does not use third-party litigation funding because it has more than enough work and can take the cases it likes on contingency on its own. Several other managing partners of large firms said they don’t use third-party funding either. But a few said they have used them on occasion as part of an alternative fee arrangement.

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Obstacles faced by young female attorneys

By: Leslie R. Pollack and Christina M. Himmel

This is 2016. It is a year where we could witness Hillary Clinton become the first female President of the United States. It is a time where women have ostensibly shattered whatever glass ceiling may have existed in the past. Yet, despite the perceived progress for women, there are still obstacles to overcome, including work-life balance.

In honor of International Women’s Day, celebrated annually in March, it seems an appropriate time to reflect on issues that impact working women—and in particular, young women attorneys.

For young women lawyers, navigating through the ever-changing legal world can be challenging for a multitude of reasons. Inequality in pay, respect, and advancement are among the issues confronting young women lawyers. According to a recent survey conducted by the Young Lawyers Division of the Florida Bar, 43% of young women attorneys have experienced gender bias. One of the survey participants said that she left a job because she “was told by the managing partner that [she] did not have to worry about making money and moving ahead because [she] would get married one day and will not have to worry about living expenses.” More than a quarter of those surveyed reported that they resigned from a position due to lack of advancement, employer insensitivity, and lack of work-life balance.

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What Lawyers Need to Know in Presenting Their Case to a Judge, Part 2

By: Ronald Dresnick

Pressure On
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There are other key factors to consider that will increase your courtroom effectiveness. Many lawyers decide against traveling to the courthouse to make their arguments. In fact, the Rules of Procedure provide that you can request the court to allow you to present your argument by phone if the hearing will prove to be inconvenient. I only have one rule for you to remember concerning this point: if you want to lose your motion, argue it by phone.

A lawyer’s stock and trade is his or her time. That rule applies evermore so for judges, so remember these few rules. First and foremost, respect the judge’s time. Don’t be late for hearings. Don’t keep the judge or even more importantly, the jury waiting. You’d be amazed at the number of times lawyers have walked into a 30 minute special set hearing five to fifteen minutes late.

Also, do you best to get your documents filed on time. Failure to do so could result in your motion or reply being stricken. And even if not technically stricken, your papers are unlikely to be read by the court before the judge makes her initial consideration. It’s also wise to provide a courtesy copy to the judge even though you have already filed your motions with the clerk. Although some judges prefer not to have paper copies, many still print out a copy to make notes or to have them handy when faced with a few minutes of down time.

Remember, it is all about perspective. Your perspective is standing before the judge. The judge, on the other hand, sits facing you, and what you don’t see is every other lawyer sitting in that courtroom, including the long line of attorneys waiting for you to finish your presentation (argument, rant, etc.). Think about it. The pressure rests on the judge.

I have many more tips to add but have run out of space.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1RBuFjZ

What Lawyers Need to Know in Presenting Their Case to a Judge

Judge-Dresnick

By:  Ronald C. Dresnick

Since leaving the bench one year ago and after nearly two decades sitting as a circuit judge, I am often asked to advise attorneys on practical tips for the preparation and presentation of courtroom arguments. Seasoned lawyers understand that judges have varying perspectives and experiences. The judge is typically focused on resolving the dispute in a fair and effective manner.

As a judge, I was frequently asked about my favored or preferred type of case; the response was easy — “a closed one.” The judge sits as the fact finder and ultimately the decider. And in state court, the judge remains the manager of a ridiculously large number of open cases.

We are fortunate to have a distinguished bench of diligent jurists, many obsessed with reading every footnote on every page that is presented by counsel. Not uncommonly, the judge will have read the motion and already decided the matter before it is even argued. That does not mean she has already made her final decision before the argument, but rather has identified an inclination and likely ruling. The argument on the motion presents the court with a chance to really test its inclination. This underscores my first point: the most pivotal factor in winning is the manner in which your pleading is crafted.

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