Law office by day, art gallery by night

Visiting Kluger Kaplan’s Miami office overlooking Biscayne Bay feels like you stumbled upon a secret upscale art gallery more than a characteristic law office.

After hours the space transforms into an art gallery and welcomes non-profits and businesses who make a charitable contribution at the firm, for an intimate cocktail hour and art tour. All proceeds are donated to the charity’s organization.

Founding partner, Alan Kluger, and his wife, retired Miami-Dade Circuit Judge, Amy Dean, have been collecting artwork for more than 30 years. Kluger hand-picked from his private collection and moved several pieces into the office.

This past month, Kluger Kaplan hosted The Tribe, a group of Jewish young professionals looking to grow both personally and professionally in various leadership capacities.

The group received a personal guided tour from Alan, who showcased his latest collection featuring artists from countries throughout the world. Each piece reflects Kluger’s desire for understanding other cultures.

With Art Basel approaching, below are some pictures from The Tribe’s recent tour and a preview of some of the notable pieces that adorn the walls of Kluger Kaplan.

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The piece titled “Vision in Green” by Haitian-born painter and sculptor Edouard Duval-Carrie, represents how the Haitian population was decimated after the European conquistadors brought plague ad disease to the land.

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Alan Kluger’s passion for art is evident as he tells the story behind his latest collection.

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The piece titled “Hoy” was created by Douglas Arguelle Cruz, an artist who lives and works in Miami, Florida, originally from Havana, Cuba.

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Alan Kluger pictured with The Tribe during their visit.

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Cuban American artist Jorge Pantoja is known for his series of drawings, that have been called visual haikus. This piece titled “Perfectionist” demonstrates his use of intimate scale and meditative strokes.

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Los Carpinteros is a Cuban artist founded in Havana in 1992 by Marco Antonio, Castillo Valdes, Dagoberto Rodriguez Sanchez, and Alexandre Arrechea. In their work, the artists incorporate aspects of architecture, design and sculpture such as this piece titled “Downtown Verde.”

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This piece titled “Rapsodia en Azul” was created by Gonzalo Cienfuegos. Gonzalo was born in Santiago, Chile in 1949, and has exhibited in various countries including Argentina, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, Spain, France and the United States.

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Members of The Tribe socializing after their personalized art tour, lead by Alan Kluger.

 

 

Three Questions with Todd Levine

Todd LevineTodd A. Levine is a Founding Member at Kluger, Kaplan, Silverman, Katzen and Levine. A highly experienced commercial litigator, Todd handles virtually all types of complex business disputes. His practice includes a strong focus on commercial real estate litigation, and he regularly represents real estate brokers, developers, lending institutions, buyers and sellers, investors, property managers, owners, contractors and subcontractors in disputes arising out of commercial real estate projects and transactions.

We recently sat down with Todd to discuss the changes in litigation over the last decade, the degree to which technology is shaping the practice and how his musical talents shape his everyday life.

We recently marked the 10-year anniversary of the financial crash on 2008 marking the beginning of the Great Recession. How has complex commercial litigation evolved over that time?

Whether the economy is in a recession or is exploding with growth, business disputes will always arise. The biggest difference between the litigation we see today and what we saw ten years ago is the type of disputes. In the aftermath of the financial crisis, we saw a lot of litigation over distressed assets, with individuals fighting for what was left over from the crash. In today’s more robust economy, we are seeing more ownership disputes as individuals seek a greater share of the profits.

There is a consistent buzz about how technology has and will continue to transform the legal profession. How has technology impacted your practice and where do you see it moving forward?

Over the last 20 years technology has improved our lawyers’ efficiency and productivity, allowing us to enhance our client service and more effectively analyze cases. The technology resources we use allow our litigators to find relevant case law in state, federal and international court, enabling us to more efficiently locate and discern necessary legal precedent. We also use tools that allow attorneys to better manage a large amount of document-based evidence, by creating a searchable database. Before these tools were available, it took litigators weeks or even months to go through the relevant case law, statutes and numerous documents in a case. Further, the attorney might have been only able to view a document once or twice before going to trial. Our lawyers can now comb through documents more efficiently and have more intimate knowledge of their contents.

However, while technology has streamlined the legal research and discovery process, artificial intelligence isn’t going to be a replacement for the trial attorney. Litigants still need to rely on the experience and expertise of their attorneys. For instance, a jury of human peers are not going to listen to two computers argue with each other about whose side makes more sense.

The Daily Business Review recently ran a profile on you about how your musical talents shaped your legal career. How has being an avid musician shaped your life in and out of the courtroom?

I’ve played the guitar since I was 10-years-old, along with playing some keyboard. Coupled with my analytical skills, my musical background has allowed me to tap into my creative side for clients and develop out-of-the-box approaches to solving complex problems. In my personal life, I have been fortunate to share my enthusiasm with my sons, who are both talented musicians and play guitar, bass and piano, and produce their own original compositions

The Real Deal: Trump Doral to pay tenant’s legal fees tied to lease dispute

Doral resort will have to pay more than $2.5M in legal bills.

Trump National Doral Miami is running up an expensive tab in a long-running legal war it’s losing against Florida Pritikin Center, a rehabilitation spa leasing space at the luxury resort.

On Wednesday, the Third District Court of Appeal affirmed a 2017 final judgement ruling by Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Jose Rodriguez against Trump Endeavor 12, the entity that owns the Doral golf resort managed by Donald Trump Jr…

…By the time the bills are tallied up, Trump Endeavor will have to pay more than $2.5 million in attorney fees in its failed bid to evict the spa from a 40,000-square-foot-space at Trump Doral, said Pritikin’s lawyer, Philippe Lieberman, a partner with the Miami firm Kluger Kaplan Silverman Katzen and Levine.

“The exact amount will be determined by Judge Rodriguez in the next couple of months,” Lieberman said. “Our client is very happy. He is looking forward to putting this behind him and recovering his legal fees from Trump.”

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Trump Endeavor attorney Bruce Rogow did not respond to a request for comment.

Pritikin sued Trump Endeavor in June 2015, alleging breach of contract. According to court documents, Pritikin had a lease with the prior owner dating back to 2009 that was still in effect when Trump Endeavor purchased the golf resort in bankruptcy court three years later. The company affirmed the lease and Pritikin was forced to remain while the Trumps renovated the property, the lawsuit states.

“At that point, the property was in disrepair and bad condition,” Lieberman said. “Trump would not reduce the rent or allow Pritikin out of the lease. When the lease was up for renewal, it coincided with when construction was coming to a close. Trump wanted to bully us off the property.”

Pritikin’s lawsuit claims that Trump tried to increase a special room rate for Pritikin clients by 583 percent, would not replace worn-out refrigeration units in the spa, attempted to reject the tenant’s option to extend the lease until 2019 and tried to improperly terminate the agreement. “We resisted,” Lieberman said. “We pushed back.”

In February 2015, Rodriguez granted Pritikin declaratory relief, which forced Trump Endeavor to honor the lease, as well as decrease its clients’ room rates by 15 percent. The developer won a subsequent appeal to the Third District Court, which sent it back to Rodriguez to provide a better explanation as to why he ruled in Pritikin’s favor, Lieberman said.

“He did that in 38-page judgement filed in June 2017,” Lieberman said. “Trump appealed that judgement and the appellate court ruled in Pritikin’s favor this Wednesday.”

Read the full story in The Real Deal. 

Rainmaker Q&A: Kluger Kaplan’s Alan Kluger

Law360

 

Founding member of Kluger Kaplan Silverman Katzen & Levine PL, Alan J. Kluger is a Miami-based powerhouse trial attorney who advocates for his clients at all stages of the litigation process. Kluger is a veteran courtroom lawyer who represents some of the nation’s largest businesses and most prominent individuals in their most challenging and complex cases.

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Many of his clients come to him after first facing him as an adversary and determining that Kluger’s tough, no-nonsense litigation tactics and creative, out-of-the-box thinking is what they need for their own disputes. His practice is guided by three key principles: thorough preparation, thoughtful strategy and mastery of the facts and the law. These are the reasons he consistently earns top rankings by peer-reviewed publications such as The Best Lawyers in America, Chambers USA and Florida Super Lawyers.

As devoted as he is to his clients, Kluger is equally passionate about his community. He and his wife, retired Judge Amy Dean, created a private charitable foundation, the Dean-Kluger Charitable Foundation, which supports various local and national charitable organizations.

Q: What skill was most important for you in becoming a rainmaker?

A: The key in becoming a rainmaker is to be able to “catch,” rather than “pitch.” That means understanding a client and asking them thoughtful questions that show you care about them and their business. So often when I meet someone, either at an event or through mutual friends, we spend so much time talking about them before they even know what it is that I do. But that is what puts me in the best position to understand the issues that they face and give the trusted advice that they need.

Click here to read the full article.