Chambers USA 2019

Kluger Kaplan Chambers 2019 (2)

Kluger Kaplan Silverman Katzen & Levine is honored to announce that the firm has been recognized in the 2019 edition of Chambers USA, as among Florida’s best in the area of Commercial Litigation. In addition, two of its partners, Alan Kluger and Philippe Lieberman, were also recognized as leaders in the practice area.

Chambers USA is one of the most esteemed legal publications in the world. The guide annually ranks preeminence in key practice areas and achievements of law firms and lawyers throughout the country using Bands, which range from 1 through 6. Rankings are designated based on significant achievements in technical legal ability, professional conduct, client service, commercial astuteness, diligence, commitment, and other qualities most valued by the client.

 

Daily Business Review: Litigation Departments of the Year — Small Firms

By Catherine Wilson

Daily Business Review

The Daily Business Review is recognizing litigation departments at small law firms with fewer than 70 attorneys in Florida for their powerhouse practices as part of the annual Professional Excellence Awards.

Many firms have carved out courtroom specialties serving major clients and government agencies, and a select few have been chosen for their noteworthy litigation achievements in 2018.

Awards will be presented to the honorees at a recognition event set May 23 at the Rusty Pelican in Miami.

REAL ESTATE-SMALL FIRMS: KLUGER KAPLAN

The 10-year-old Kluger Kaplan litigation boutique distinguished itself in an assortment of hypertechnical real estate cases in 2018.

When the joint developers of the 19-unit boutique condominium at 300 Collins Ave. fought for control of the five-story building in Miami Beach’s resurrected South of Fifth neighborhood, Kluger Kaplan attorney Marko Cerenko succeeded in enforcing a buy-sell reverse option for his client, PSB Collins LLC, led by the Goldman Sachs’ youngest partner, Dhruv Piplani. Developer Jason Halpern’s JMH Development refused to surrender the property until Miami-Dade Circuit Judge William Thomas ruled for PSB last October.

Kluger Kaplan’s Alan Kluger and Josh Rubens, along with Todd Legon of Legon Fodiman, represented the minority owner of Miami Beach’s Seagull Hotel in obtaining a forced partition of the property and the $31 million sale of the beachfront hotel in January 2018 after 14 months of litigation.

The Third District Court of Appeal last August affirmed a decision in favor of Florida Pritikin Center LLC and its long-term lease at the Trump National Doral Miami golf resort. Kluger and Philippe Lieberman maintained soon-to-be President Donald Trump wrongly tried to force the center out of its leased space and out of business.

The appellate court last June also affirmed a decision favoring the sellers represented by Kluger and Ashley Frankel, along with Scott Kravetz of Duane Morris, in a $2.8 million home sale contract. The decision strictly upheld the termination provisions of the Florida Bar’s standard contract for real estate home purchases.

The founders of the 28-attorney Miami law firm sought to build a strong niche practice that would complement rather than compete with full-service firms. In the process, the firm has turned some previous adversaries into clients.

Law office by day, art gallery by night

Visiting Kluger Kaplan’s Miami office overlooking Biscayne Bay feels like you stumbled upon a secret upscale art gallery more than a characteristic law office.

After hours the space transforms into an art gallery and welcomes non-profits and businesses who make a charitable contribution at the firm, for an intimate cocktail hour and art tour. All proceeds are donated to the charity’s organization.

Founding partner, Alan Kluger, and his wife, retired Miami-Dade Circuit Judge, Amy Dean, have been collecting artwork for more than 30 years. Kluger hand-picked from his private collection and moved several pieces into the office.

This past month, Kluger Kaplan hosted The Tribe, a group of Jewish young professionals looking to grow both personally and professionally in various leadership capacities.

The group received a personal guided tour from Alan, who showcased his latest collection featuring artists from countries throughout the world. Each piece reflects Kluger’s desire for understanding other cultures.

With Art Basel approaching, below are some pictures from The Tribe’s recent tour and a preview of some of the notable pieces that adorn the walls of Kluger Kaplan.

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The piece titled “Vision in Green” by Haitian-born painter and sculptor Edouard Duval-Carrie, represents how the Haitian population was decimated after the European conquistadors brought plague ad disease to the land.

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Alan Kluger’s passion for art is evident as he tells the story behind his latest collection.

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The piece titled “Hoy” was created by Douglas Arguelle Cruz, an artist who lives and works in Miami, Florida, originally from Havana, Cuba.

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Alan Kluger pictured with The Tribe during their visit.

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Cuban American artist Jorge Pantoja is known for his series of drawings, that have been called visual haikus. This piece titled “Perfectionist” demonstrates his use of intimate scale and meditative strokes.

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Los Carpinteros is a Cuban artist founded in Havana in 1992 by Marco Antonio, Castillo Valdes, Dagoberto Rodriguez Sanchez, and Alexandre Arrechea. In their work, the artists incorporate aspects of architecture, design and sculpture such as this piece titled “Downtown Verde.”

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This piece titled “Rapsodia en Azul” was created by Gonzalo Cienfuegos. Gonzalo was born in Santiago, Chile in 1949, and has exhibited in various countries including Argentina, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, Spain, France and the United States.

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Members of The Tribe socializing after their personalized art tour, lead by Alan Kluger.

 

 

Kluger Kaplan’s Daniel Rosen Reappointed to Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board

Complex commercial litigation firm Kluger, Kaplan, Silverman, Katzen & Levine announces that Daniel N. Rosen, Partner-in-Charge of the firm’s Minneapolis office, was appointed by Governor Mark Dayton to a second term as a member of the Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board.

Dan RosenThe Minnesota Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board is tasked with regulating campaign finance and lobbyist activities in state campaigns. Mr. Rosen has served on the board since 2014 and served as its Chair between 2016 and 2017. His new term will run through January 2022.

 “I am honored that Governor Dayton has appointed me to serve another term on this critically important board,” said Mr. Rosen. “Transparency and disclosure in campaign finance is essential to our election process, and I look forward to working alongside my colleagues to ensure these values continue to be upheld.”

As Partner-in-Charge of Kluger Kaplan’s Minneapolis office, Mr. Rosen focuses his practice on complex commercial and real estate litigation. He is a leading Minnesota lawyer representing property owners in eminent domain takings and has represented major national corporations including Exxon Mobil, Walgreens and Sears Holdings. Mr. Rosen is a former officer in the United States Navy and served in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

The Campaign Finance and Public Disclosure Board consists of six members, appointed by the Governor of Minnesota on a bi-partisan basis for staggered four-year terms. The appointments must be confirmed by a three-fifths vote of the members of each house of the legislature. Its mission is to promote public confidence in state government decision-making through development, administration, and enforcement of disclosure and public financing programs.

Workers are dressing more casually. Does that affect productivity?

Miami Herald titleBy Cindy Krischer Goodman

As the summer brings sweltering heat, office dress is shifting. Skirts and sleeves are shorter, sandals are prevalent, and both seasoned professionals and the summer’s crop of interns test the boundaries of casual dress.

But as office dress codes become more relaxed, some employers worry that the work ethic will weaken. Will wearing polo shirts to the office discourage employees from staying past 6 p.m.? Will dressing in khakis instead of a power suit make a manager less likely to invite clients to lunch? Will wearing sandals lessen someone’s motivation to negotiate a deal?

Alan Kluger_063 greySome employers give their employees leeway to dress up or down, asking mostly that they “be presentable” in the office. At the Miami law firm of Kluger Kaplan, lawyers often walk the hallways in nice jeans and a button-down shirt. But when they go to court, Alan Kluger urges attorneys to dress the part and insists it creates confidence and credibility: “If you’re in front of a jury, you want to be the lawyer they want to hire. Dress makes a difference in the courthouse, it just does.”

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